Koori Woman Blues
16 Jun 2014 | Blues - Album

Uncategorized

‘MOOGA-MOOGA’ PAINTING BY MARLENE CUMMINS TO BE BEAMED ONTO SYDNEY UNI DURING VIVID FESTIVAL

‘MOOGA-MOOGA’ PAINTING BY MARLENE CUMMINS TO BE BEAMED ONTO SYDNEY UNI DURING VIVID FESTIVAL

20140515_150212

Marlene Cummins’ painting of her totem, Mooga-Mooga the whale, representing the female spirits of her Woppaburra ancestors, will be beamed onto the iconic buildings of Sydney University’s Main Quadrangle as part of  Vivid Festival’s inaugural Vivid Path to the Future from Saturday 22nd May  to 3rd June from 6pm every day except Sunday. For the first time, the University of Sydney will participate by transforming their campus into an interactive canvas of student art, including a spectacular illumination of the Quadrangle ‘painted’ by Indigenous and local artists. The Mooga-Mooga painting features spirit figures at the bottom of the whale, symbolising the connection with the whale as a gentle but powerful body and the spirit of women. Its strength and nurturing character represents Woppaburra women who played a strong integral part in the decision-making of the Woppaburra people, keeping the tribe together with their nurturing spirits.   Women were placed in important roles and their strength acknowledged. The Woppaburra women come from a culture of women spirits and figures that inhabited the ocean too.

Marlene’s grandmother was the last of them – Kanome, which is also the name of Keppel Island. Marlene and her people are currently fighting the likes of Terry Agnew and Greg Norman to stop them from exploiting the island and developing it with a Tourist Resort and golf course, to protect it for future generations.  “It’s a small island and such tourism will impact hugely on the local wildlife. The whales migrate up there and turtles lay their eggs up there,” says Marlene.  “We want to stop these developers who are already millionaires from developing the island. The whale represents the strength and might of us Woppaburra who are left. We are the descendants of a lot of Woppaburra who were murdered and enslaved and pushed off the island. My Kanome was in the boat, one of the last 13 people who were pushed off the island, forcibly removed in a dingy,” Marlene says.

The Vivid Path to the Future  celebration will include performances and Sydney Ideas talks at the Seymour Centre, as well as lighting installations, live entertainment and workshops that will celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture on campus.

Vivid Sydney is a unique annual event of light, music and ideas that illuminates the city’s iconic architecture into a breathtaking playground of innovative and inspiring lighting sculptures, installations and music.

admin

May 23rd, 2014

1 Comment

One Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *